Category Archives: Story told

11th August 1968 and British Rail makes 3 Special Offers

 A 315 mile, almost eleven hour journey marked the end of standard gauge steam-hauled passenger service on British Railways.  The timings sheet was headed with the statement – ‘Last steam hauled train on Britain Railways on standard track, Sunday 11th August 1968.’

A ‘Souvenir Platform Ticket’ was available – it tells us that: The last steam hauled train to operate on standard gauge track will run on Sunday, 11th August 1968.  The train will run from Liverpool 09.10 via Manchester to Carlisle calling at Manchester Victoria at 10.36 and 18.48 and will be hauled from Liverpool to Manchester by a class 5 locomotive.

Front & back of a souvenir platform ticket is available from The John Debens Collection.   Manchester Victoria souvenir platform ticket 2s 6d.  Not valid on Train. Not Transferable.

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My Fair Lady – Audrey Hepburn – and Aphrodite!

It was on Wednesday 3rd July 1963 that Cecil Beaton recorded the filming of My Fair Lady in his journal:

I had watched Audrey [Hepburn] during the tests, wearing almost no make-up and being photographed in a somewhat flat light. One took for granted her charm and vitality, but it was only when the result was magnified hundreds of times, that one realised that, as Jack Warner said, ‘She’s one in a million.’ Somehow, the celluloid accentuates her expressions of tenderness, humour, fun, hauteur and plaintive childishness. Her nose and jawline do not conform to the golden rule of Praxiteles yet add enormous character to the photographed result. 

After seeing herself without eye make-up Audrey pleased me by saying that, in the future, she was going to soft-pedal its use. The ‘Flemish look’, without make-up, is going to be a surprise. Suddenly, one realizes what a hard look the black liner gives the eye, and how its effect is to close up, and make smaller, the white of the eye. Audrey’s appearance without it will be quite a revolution and, let’s hope, the end of all those black-eyed zombies of the fashion magazines.

Just in case you wish to know – and are like me and did not know who/what Praxiteles was – he was a 4th century BCE Greek from Athens, the son of Cephisodotus the Elder, and was the most renowned of the Attic sculptors of the time, being the first to sculpt the nude female form in a life-size statue.

Marlene Dietrich in Australia

Marlene was a great traveller in the 1960s & 70s.  She was settled in England but in 1963 she also visited and performed in Monaco; Belgium; Spain; Germany; Mexico; various states in the USA; Stockholm as well as the Royal Albert Hall & the Prince of Wales Theatre in England.  This traveling would continue until the mid-1970s.  Her first visit to Australia was in 1965 where Marlene was at Melbourne’s Princess Theatre from the 7th to 23rd October before moving on to Sydney’s Theatre Royal from 28th October to 13th November.

It was three years later, in March 1968, that she returned to Australia and her arrival for a Festival was front page news, particularly when she was accused of slapping a television reporter!

Her first visit, though, was to the Adelaide Teachers College Theatre, Adelaide on 8th March where she appeared before an adoring audience at the Adelaide Teachers College Theatre.  The next day Jeff Turner of The News reported that Marlene was: ‘Magnificent in yards of fur and a shimmering form-hugging gown, she sang about love, about war. She sang old songs and new songs. And the audience did exactly as she wanted.’

She was still in Adelaide from 18th to 21st March before moving to the major performance that was to be at the Princess Theatre, Melbourne on Friday 23rd March.  The 1968 Festival was programmed by a committee of six officials and, while Marlene Dietrich was indisputably the Festival’s star attraction, other highlights included the Jerusalem Chamber Orchestra; the Salzburg Marionette Theatre; a performance of Mahler’s Eighth symphony by the combined South Australian and Melbourne symphony orchestras; opera singers Marie Collier and Tito Gobbi, and Acker Bilk and his Paramount Jazz Band!

The press of the time records: ‘the Hollywood screen legend Marlene Dietrich, performing songs which are musically arranged by Burt Bacharach, musical direction and orchestra directed by William Blezard, lighting devised by Joe Davis – performances by arrangement with Aztec Services Pty. Ltd. (Kenn Brodziak – Managing Director) and the 1968 Adelaide Festival of Arts, support act: Twiliters.’

It was seven years later, in September 1975, that Marlene made her third Australian visit.  From September 1st to 13th she was at Her Majesty’s Theatre in Melbourne.  She then moved on to the Canberra Theatre in Canberra for the 16th to 18th September.

Her final performances were at Her Majesty’s Theatre in Sydney.  The schedule was for a run from 22nd September to 4th October 1975.  Unfortunately Marlene’s career largely ended on 29th September 1975, when she fell off the stage and broke her thigh.

She would perform publicly no more.  To add more to her troubles – the following year, on 24th June 1976 her husband, Rudolf Sieber, died of cancer.

Marlene’s final on-camera film appearance was a cameo role in the 1979 film ‘Just a Gigolo’ which starred David Bowie and was directed by David Hemmings, in which she sang the title song.

It was nice to see you Marlene

On the late morning of Tuesday 27th February 2018 (yesterday) I was scanning through my weekend magazine to see what was on.  On page 55 I found that, at 12.35pm in their Film 4 program on Freeview 15; Freesat 300; Sky 315 & Virgin 428 (HD429) was a 1939 film – ‘Destry Rides Again’.  The star, playing the sheriff, was James Stewart that ‘makes an enemy, later a friend, in the shape of a sultry saloon singer’.  No mention was made of the real name of that woman but I knew who she was – I had written about her in my posting earlier this month.  It was Marlene Dietrich!

I wonder if I could make this a valid excuse to sit at home and watch more films!